1. K-State home
  2. »College of Veterinary Medicine
  3. »2018 NA-PRRS Symposium
  4. »Speakers

College of Veterinary Medicine

2018 Symposium Speakers

Mike Roof

Mike Roof
Boehringer-Ingelheim

Keynote Speaker

Dr. Mike Roof earned his M.S. and Ph.D. at Iowa State University in 1991 with emphasis on virulence mechanisms of Salmonella and swine immunology that ultimately led to ISU patents on vaccine technology. This technology was licensed by NOBL Laboratories, a company focused on swine diseases, and Mike joined the company as Scientist to further develop and commercialize the technology (Product SC-54). During his tenure at NOBL, the "mystery pig" disease occurred and Mike collaborated with Boehringer Ingelheim, SDSU, University of Minnesota, and IDDLO to be part of the initial PRRS investigations and research. He subsequently was involved in the research, development, licensure, and launch of the first PRRS MLV (Ingelvac PRRS) in the USA and has subsequently been licensed in over 26 countries across the globe. NOBL was acquired by Boehringer Ingelheim and Mike played various leadership roles leading Swine R&D, leading US R&D sites (Ames, St Joseph, Fort Dodge), and through 2016 a global role coordinating Bio-Vaccine efforts across all major species. Throughout this time he has remained active in the area of PRRS R&D with additional product licenses in the US (3FLEX, and Ingelvac PRRS ATP) as well as EU registration of a type 1 MLV (PRRS FLEX EU). He has also been involved in numerous internal and collaborative efforts investigating new and different PRRS solutions such as chimeric vaccines, infectious clones, KV/MLV combinations, and alternate routes and formulations. In recent years Mike has had the opportunity to work for some extended period of time in Ingelheim Germany, Hannover Germany, and Shanghai China China which gives him a good global perspective on animal health and swine diseases. Mike and his wife (Jill) have 2 children (Kevin and Kayla) who are successful professionals in Mechanical Engineering and Physical Therapy PhD, respectively. The Roof family enjoys anything outdoors and active – hiking, biking, skiing, boating, hunting, fishing as well as good food and wine!

Johnny Callahan

Johnny Callahan
Tetracore

Dr. Johnny Callahan is the Manager of Veterinary Diagnostics Business Development and the USDA/CVB Regulatory Affairs Liaison for Tetracore, Inc. in Rockville, MD.  He received his BS degree in Medical Technology from the University of South Carolina in Charleston and then a MS and PhD in Medical Pathology from the University of Maryland in 1994 and 2005 respectively. His professional career spanning 33+ years has been devoted to laboratory medicine where he has kept pace with the expansion of technology for the detection and characterization of public health, veterinary and zoonotic pathogens. It is his philosophy that the classical laboratory methods are not entirely replaced by modern molecular methods and that the laboratory should make use of all of the tools available to provide the most accurate laboratory diagnosis.  To understand the status of an infection for any given disease within an infected host, a laboratorian needs to consider how the host-disease interaction determines the outcome of disease.  With this underlying knowledge the most appropriate test can be selected and used on the most appropriate  sample matrix that will best illustrate the disease status for a given patient or animal.  The journeyman laboratory worker understands the immunopathogenisis of disease; the advantages and limitations of each laboratory test and will be able to explain the significance of the laboratory results to the public health or veterinary clinician.

Scott Dee

Scott Dee
Pipestone Applied Research

Dr. Scott Dee earned his DVM, MS and PhD from the University of Minnesota.  He is a board certified veterinary microbiologist and a past President of the AASV. After working in swine practice for 12 years, Scott was a Professor at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine where he focused his research on the transmission and biosecurity of PRRSV for a 12-year period.  This effort culminated in the development and validation of a nationally-applied air filtration system for reducing the introduction of airborne diseases to swine facilities. In 2011, Scott joined Pipestone Veterinary Services in Pipestone, MN where he currently serves as Director of Pipestone Applied Research (PAR), a business unit which conducts collaborative research efforts with production companies across North America comprising approximately 1.5 million sows. Scott has been awarded > 9M in research funds, has published 146 papers in peer reviewed journals (including the initial publication providing proof of concept of PEDV transmission in feed) and is currently studying the transboundary risk of pathogen spread through feed ingredients. He has received the AASV Practitioner of the Year award, the Leman Science in Practice award and the AASV Howard Dunne Memorial award.  Scott and his wife Lisa have 2 children (Nicholas and Ellen) and live in Alexandria, MN along with their Scottish terrier, Abigail.

Diego Diel

Diego Diel
South Dakota State University

Dr. Diego Diel received his DVM degree from Federal University of Santa Maria (UFSM), Brazil in 2004. He conducted a MS in Virology at the same institution and then came to University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to conduct the research of his PhD degree, which was completed in 2010. Dr. Diel joint the USDA Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory in 2011 for post-doctoral training and then returned to the University of Illinois in 2013 for a second post-doc. In August, 2014 Dr. Diel joined the Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences at the South Dakota State University as an Assistant professor, in 2016 he became the section leader of the Virology section in the Animal Disease and Research Diagnostic Laboratory (ADRDL).

Kay Faaberg

Kay Faaberg
USDA Agricultural Research Service

Dr. Kay Faaberg, PhD, is a Research Microbiologist and the Lead Scientist for the project “Intervention Strategies to Control Endemic and New and Emerging Viral Diseases of Swine” of the National Animal Disease Center, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture. A molecular virologist studying porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine coronaviruses, Dr. Faaberg and her collaborators use reverse genetics to modify viral genomes in order to better understand the pathogenesis of swine nidoviruses. She is also interested in PRRSV evolution and recombination. Her laboratory was the first to assemble an infectious clone of the Type 2 PRRSV prototype strain, VR-2332, has since developed reverse genetic systems for several other PRRSV strains, PRRSV chimeras and coronaviruses, described the first evidence of high frequency viral recombination in PRRSV, and led the initiative to deposit more than 8500 PRRSV ORF5 and 47 complete genomes into GenBank, the United States National Institutes of Health Genetic Sequence Database. Dr. Faaberg’s team and collaborators are presently engaged in the study of the contribution of viral enzymes to nidoviral  interferon inhibition and virulence, producing a vaccine for swine coronaviruses and a DIVA vaccine for newer strains of PRRSV, and in implementing the new US Swine Pathogen Database.

Douglas Gladue

Douglas Gladue
Plum Island Animal Disease Center, ARS, USDA

Dr. Douglas Gladue received his Ph.D. in Molecular Genetics and Microbiology from Stony Brook University and is currently a Senior Scientist at the Foreign Animal Disease Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service at Plum Island Animal Disease Center. For over a decade, his research has focused on the molecular mechanisms of viral pathogenesis and virus-host protein interactions and applying these discoveries to the design of rational vaccines for foreign animal viral diseases. He has discovered over one hundred host-viral protein interactions and has used this discovery combined with a custom computational pipeline involving both bioinformatic and functional genomic data, to identify critical domains in viral proteins. Deletion or mutation of these domains has been used as a basis to develop rationally designed vaccines for both classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). With no commercial vaccine and recent outbreaks of ASFV affecting the Caucasus and Eastern Europe, Dr. Gladue has focused his research on developing a novel rationally designed ASFV vaccine. His recent accomplishments include the functional characterization of ASFV proteins and the development of new methodology allowing for rapid development of recombinant ASFV with multiple deletions in the ASFV genome, allowing for safer ASFV vaccine design strategies. Dr. Gladue has authored numerous peer-reviewed scientific publications, served on multiple scientific committees, editorial boards, and holds multiple patents in the field of foreign animal diseases.

Yaowei Huang

Yaowei Huang
Zhejiang University

Dr. Huang received his B.S. degree in Biology from Nanjing University in China and his Ph.D. degree from Department of Biomedical Engineering of Zhejiang University in China. He then joined College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, as a Postdoctoral Associate and later as a Research Assistant Professor, focusing on molecular mechanism of replication and pathogenesis of hepatitis E virus (HEV), PRRSV and Torque teno sus virus (TTSuV). Dr. Huang accepted a professor position in Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Animal Sciences of Zhejiang University, China, in 2013. Dr. Huang has authored or co-authored 62 publications in peer review journals such as mBio, Journal of Virology and Emerging Infectious Diseases. In 2017, his lab discovered a novel swine enteric alphacoronavirus (SeACoV; also referred as SADS-CoV by another lab) derived from the bat coronavirus HKU2 from diarrheic piglets in Southern China. His current research is mainly focused on epidemiology, biology and vaccine development of swine enteric coronaviruses including PEDV, PDCoV and SeACoV/SADS-CoV.

Andrew Kick

Andrew Kick
North Carolina
State University

Lieutenant Colonel Andrew Kick is a military intelligence officer in the United States Army.  Andrew obtained his MS from North Carolina State University (NCSU) in 2010 with Dr. Glen Almond and studied the effects of husbandry stress on the porcine adaptive immune system.   Andrew taught chemistry and human physiology at the United States Military Academy (USMA) from 2010-2013.  Andrew is currently pursuing a PhD at NCSU and researching the adaptive immune response to PRRSV with Dr. Tobias Kaeser and Dr. Almond.  His follow-on assignment is teaching at USMA.  Andrew has deployed to Iraq, Afghanistan and served multiple tours in the Republic of Korea.

Kyu-Sang Lim

Kyu-Sang Lim
Iowa State University

Dr. Kyu-Sang Lim grew up in South Korea and received B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Korea University. He did his first post-doctoral research at the National Institute of Animal Science, South Korea, on meat quality in pigs, imprinting in cattle and heat stress in ducks using RNA-sequencing data. In 2017, he joined the Animal Breeding and Genetics group at Iowa State University as a post-doctoral research associate. Current research focuses on developing methods to select for disease resilience in pigs based on blood gene expression profiles of young healthy pigs by applying quantitative genetic analysis to population-level of transcriptome data prior to exposure to a natural polymicrobial disease challenge.

Enric Mateu

Enric Mateu
IRTA-UAB, Spain

Dr. Enric Mateu is professor of infectious diseases at the Veterinary Faculty of Barcelona and researcher at CReSA-IRTA. Earned his Veterinary Medicine Degree in 1989, got a PhD from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona in 1993 and is (European) Diplomate in Porcine Health and Management. He was a post-doc researcher at the University of Illinois in 1994-95. His research focuses on viral diseases of swine, particularly PRRS. He authored or co-authored numerous papers on the immune response of pigs to viral agents.

Alex Morrow

Alex Morrow
STAR-IDAZ

Dr. Alex Morrow, BA, MVB, PhD, MRCVS is veterinary surgeon with eighteen years’ experience in research working on the pathogenesis and control of Amblyomma variegatum-associated dermatophilosis, followed by four years in a research support capacity at Edinburgh University and fourteen years in his current position in research programme management with Defra where he is International Evidence Lead Animal Health and Welfare.  He established and coordinated for 10 years the European Collaborative Working Group (CWG) on Animal Health and Welfare research, under the EU Standing Committee on Agriculture Research, and led the associated EU-funded EMIDA ERA-NET on Emerging and Major Infectious Diseases of Animals.  He currently leads the STAR-IDAZ global network, “Global Strategic Alliances for the Coordination of Research on the Major Infectious Diseases of Animals and Zoonoses”, and the associated International Research Consortium (IRC), with a higher level of commitment to collaboration, which was launched by the European Commission in January 2016.  He now also heads the EU-funded IRC secretariat.

Waithaka Mwangi

Waithaka Mwangi
Kansas State University

Dr. Waithaka Mwangi received his BS from the University of Nairobi, Kenya in 1990 and his PhD from Washington State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, where he also did postdoctoral training for two years and then accepted a non-tenure track Assistant Professor and Graduate Faculty position.  He joined Texas A&M University, College of Veterinary Medicine in July 2005 as a tenure track Assistant Professor and Graduate Faculty.  He was promoted to a tenured Associate Professor in 2014. In 2016, he was recruited to Kansas State University, College of Veterinary Medicine as a tenured Associate Professor/Graduate Faculty and Director of the flow cytometry lab. Current research efforts are focused on the development of prototype live-vectored vaccines for protection of pigs against African Swine Fever Virus and development of broadly protective Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus subunit vaccines.  His third area of research is on exploitation of novel cow antibodies that have unique antigen binding structures capable of binding unique/cryptic markers to develop potent broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV and other pathogens.  He is a member of the American Association of Veterinary Immunologists and American Association of Immunologists (AAI) where he is currently serving as a member of the AAI-Veterinary Immunology Committee.

Megan Niederwerder

Megan Niederwerder
Kansas State University

Dr. Megan Niederwerder is an Assistant Professor at the Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine in the Department of Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology.  She received her DVM from Kansas State University and after 3 years as a practicing veterinarian, Dr. Niederwerder returned to Kansas State where she completed her PhD in viral diseases of swine.  Dr. Niederwerder’s research is focused on understanding the risks of virus introduction and transmission in feed and feed ingredients as well as identifying tools to mitigate this risk.  The Niederwerder laboratory also investigates the gut microbiome as an alternative tool for reducing the effects of polymicrobial respiratory disease on the health and growth of commercial swine.  Her work has included ASFV, CSFV, PRV, PRRSV, PEDV and PCV2.  Dr. Niederwerder serves as the course coordinator and instructor of Veterinary Virology to second year veterinary professional students.

Michael Rahe

Michael Rahe
Iowa State University

Michael P. Murtaugh Memorial Lecture

Dr. Michael Rahe is a post-doctoral research associate in the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at Iowa State University. He received both his Bachelor's degree and his DVM degree from Iowa State University while concurrently achieving his Master of Public Health from the University of Iowa. He then joined Michael Murtaugh's lab at the University of Minnesota where he worked on characterizing the memory B cell response to PRRSV infection. After graduating with his PhD in 2017, he transitioned to his current role at the ISU Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory where he is in his second year of training as an anatomic pathology resident and diagnostician trainee.

Daniel Rock

Daniel L. Rock
University of Illinois

Dr Rock's research has focused on animal infectious disease with an emphasis on molecular mechanisms underlying viral virulence and host range of high-consequence viral diseases such as African swine fever, classical swine fever, foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest and exotic poxviruses. His laboratory has used comparative and functional genomic approaches together with animal disease models to define and characterize the role of specific viral and host genes in disease.

Dr. Rock obtained a BSE degree from Drake University in Des Moines and a Ph.D. in Veterinary Microbiology from Iowa State University in 1981. His Postdoctoral research was at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia in molecular virology. He held faculty positions at North Dakota State University and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln before joining the Agricultural Research Service as Research Leader of Exotic Viral Diseases at the Plum Island Animal Disease Center in New York in 1989. There he developed and led major research initiatives on foreign animal diseases, pathogen functional genomics and rapid pathogen detection. In March 2005 he joined the faculty of the Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

Bob Rowland

Bob Rowland
Kansas State University

Dr. Raymond R. R. “Bob” Rowland is a Professor in the Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology of Kansas State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine. Rowland’s current research interests center on addressing fundamental problems in the detection and control of infectious diseases caused by emerging and foreign pig viruses. A historical focus has been on the molecular mechanisms of diseases caused by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2). Since 2008, the Rowland lab has been actively involved in understanding the role of host genetics in the response of pigs to viral infection, including the first characterization of a line of pigs that are SCID; i.e. lack an immune system. The extension of the genetics approach is the use of genetic modification of PRRSV receptors to make pigs resistant to disease. Related research includes the control of viruses in the field and the development of novel detection methods for domestic and foreign animal diseases, such as classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and African swine fever virus (ASFV).  Rowland is actively involved in the research training of graduate, undergraduate and DVM students. Rowland is co-director of the PRRS Host Genetics Consortium (PHGC) and the Executive Director of the North American PRRS Symposium, an annual meeting held in Chicago.  Rowland serves on advisory boards related to PRRS and other infectious diseases.

Nick Serao

Nick Serão
Iowa State University

Dr. Nick Serão is an Assistant Professor of Swine Genetics in the Department of Animal Science at Iowa State University. Nick Serão research program focuses on the genetic and genomics bases of swine health, reproduction, and mortality, and on statistical methodologies for genomic and experimental analyses. Nick Serão grew up in Brazil and received BSc. (Animal Science; 2007) and MSc. (Breeding and Genetics; 2009) degrees from the Federal University of Viçosa, and a PhD in Animal Science (focused in Statistical Genomics) from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. After 2.5 years as a Postdoctoral Research Associated at Iowa State University, working on genetics and genomics of swine health, he was on the faculty at North Carolina State University from 2015 to 2017, working on swine and cattle health, and statistical methodologies. Since March 2017, he is an Assistant Professor of Swine Genetics at Iowa State University.

Tomasz Stadejek

Tomasz Stadejek
Warsaw University
of Life Sciences

Professor Dr. Tomasz Stadejek graduated from the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland in 1990. From 1991 to 2011 he worked at the Department of Swine Diseases of the National Veterinary Research Institute in Pulawy, Poland. He obtained his Ph.D. in 1996 and D.Sc. in 2002. He worked as a guest researcher at the National Animal Disease Centre (NADC) and National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa, USA, National Veterinary Institute in Uppsala, Sweden, Veterinary Laboratories Agency - Weybridge, Addlestone, UK and National Veterinary Institute, Lindholm, Denmark. His main research topics were molecular diagnosis and epidemiology of pestiviruses, arteriviruses and circoviruses. In 2007 Prof. Stadejek was appointed by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) as an expert for PRRS, and in 2007-2011 he was the head of the OIE. Reference Laboratory for PRRS. He is a member of Arterivirus Study Group of the International Committee for Taxonomy of Viruses. In 2008 he obtained diploma of the European College of Porcine Health Management (ECPHM) and from 2011 to 2013 he was a board member and the secretary of the college. Since 2012 he is full professor at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at the Warsaw University of Life Sciences. His current research is focused on diagnostic and epidemiology of emerging viral pathogens of swine and their impact on production performance.

Paul Sundberg

Paul Sundberg
Swine Health Information Center

Dr. Paul Sundberg is the Swine Health Information Center’s Executive Director.  The mission of the Swine Health Information Center is to protect and enhance the health of the United States swine herd through coordinated global disease monitoring, targeted research investments that minimize the impact of future disease threats, and analysis of swine health data.  Dr. Sundberg is responsible for implementing the Center’s mission and objectives.  

Dr. Sundberg was named to this position in July 2015.  Before leading the Swine Health Information Center, he was a Vice President with the National Pork Board and responsible for the programs and personnel of the Science and Technology Department.  

Dr. Sundberg attended the University of Nebraska-Lincoln where he earned his bachelor’s degree in education.  He completed his veterinary medicine curriculum and master’s degree in clinical science/preventive medicine at Iowa State University.  He also earned a doctorate degree in veterinary microbiology with a specialty in preventive medicine from Iowa State University.  He is board certified in the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine and is a past president of the College.

Dr. Sundberg is a member of the American Veterinary Medical Association, the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association, the American Association of Swine Veterinarians and the Iowa Veterinary Medical Association. 

Paul and his wife Debra live in Ames, Iowa.

Qiuhong Wang

Qiuhong Wang
The Ohio State University

Dr. Wang, Associate Professor, FAHRP, Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, OARDC, at The Ohio State University has received extensive training in preventive medicine, virology, veterinary sciences, and cell biology.  Her background includes studying rotavirus, astrovirus, calicivirus and coronavirus.  She has studied porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) since its US emergence in spring, 2013 and is a corresponding/co-corresponding author for more than ten peer-reviewed journal articles and several review articles/book chapters on PEDV. Her laboratory is one of a few labs in the US to isolate and passage genetically diverse PEDV strains in cell culture, and to study PEDV pathogenesis in germfree piglets, cesarean-derived colostrum-deprived (CDCD) piglets, and conventional nursing piglets and the sows.  Currently, her team is studying the genetic factors related to PEDV virulence using reverse genetics technologies, and testing the virulence of recombinant viruses in pigs.

Kimberly VanderWaal

Kimberly VanderWaal
University of Missouri

Dr. Kimberly VanderWaal is an assistant professor in the Department of Veterinary Population Medicine at the College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota.  She is a disease ecologist and epidemiologist who has worked extensively on understanding transmission of pathogens in animal populations.  Her research combines tools from data science, infectious disease ecology, network analysis, computational modeling, and animal movement data to improve surveillance, prevention, and control of infectious pathogens of cattle and swine.  She has spearheaded projects related to the use of animal movement data to understand the spread of diseases at regional and national levels.  These models have been used to develop targeted control strategies for bovine tuberculosis and to understand the spread of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PED) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRS) in the US.

Kristin Whitworth

Kristin Whitworth
University of Missouri

Dr. Kristin Whitworth is a research scientist and Interim Project Director at the University of Missouri National Swine Resource and Research Center (NSRRC).   She completed her B.S. in agriculture from Illinois State University and a M.S. and PhD in animal science with an emphasis in reproductive biology from the University of Missouri.   Kristin focuses her research efforts on the use of gene editing tools such as CRISPR/Cas9 to create both agricultural and biomedical pig models.  Kristin’s role as Project Director for the NSRRC includes providing and distributing high quality pig models to the scientific community.

Alexei Zabeezhny

Alexei Zaberezhny
K.I.Skryabin and Y.R.Kovalenko Federal Research Center “All-Russian Research Institute of   Experimental Veterinary Medicine”, Russian Academy of Science

Dr. Alexei D. Zaberezhny is a Science Director of K.I.Skryabin and Y.R.Kovalenko Federal Research Center “All-Russian Research Institute of   Experimental Veterinary Medicine”, Russian Academy of Science,  located in Moscow (since 2012). He received MS degree in Molecular Biology at Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (1983), Candidate of  Science (Ph.D.) in Biochemistry at Y.R.Kovalenko All-Union Research Institute of Veterinary  Medicine, USSR Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Moscow (1988), Doctor of Science in Virology, D.I.Ivanovski Virology Institute, Russian Academy of Medical Science, Moscow (2004), Professor in Virology since 2010. He received additional training as post-doctoral scientist (1990-1993) at Veterinary Medical Research Institute, College of  Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames IA, at laboratory of Prof. Prem Paul and in collaboration with Dr.W. Mengeling at NADC. Since 1997 he supervises a laboratory at D.I.Ivanovski Virology Institute (Moscow). His work has always been focused on swine viruses, including classical swine fever virus (CSFV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). He is also Assistant to Editor-in-Chief of Voprosy Virusologii (Problems of Virology) since 2006.