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Veterinary Health Center

Interpretation

Radiographic Findings:

The thorax is within normal limits. There are several sites of spondylosis deformans in the lumbar spine. There is moth-eaten lysis and amorphous new bone formation at several sites of the right ilium and ischium, the sacrum, and first 4 caudal vertebrae. The urinary bladder is severely distended with fluid. There is cranial displacement of the majority of the intestinal tract. The colon is ventrally displaced in the caudal abdomen. There is increased soft tissue opacity in the tissues just ventral to the caudal lumbar spine. There are several mottled mineral opacities in the cranioventral abdomen. This likely represents material in the GI tract. Due to the size of the bladder and cranial displacement of the majority of the intestines, the kidneys are not clearly seen on any of the views. The spleen is not seen on the lateral view. However, it is normal on the ventrodorsal views.

Close-up view of caudal lumbar spine.
Close-up view of caudal lumbar spine.

Radiographic Impressions:

Lysis and amorphous new bone formation in the caudal lumbar and cranial portion of the caudal spine, along with the right hemipelvis are most consistent with metastatic or primary neoplasia. Lesser consideration would be given to spondylitis and osteomyelitis. Increased soft tissue opacity ventral to the caudal lumbar spine is indicative of sublumbar lymphadenopathy. Rule outs for this finding should include neoplastic disease with lesser consideration given to reactive lymph node. Rule outs for distention of the urinary bladder are obstructive disease of the urinary bladder such as neoplasia, inflammatory disease, or urolithiasis, or neurologic dysfunction caused by changes in the caudal lumbar spine. Based on the findings of aggressive osseous lesions, sublumbar lymphadenopathy, and bladder distention, neoplasia is most likely in this patient. Recommend repeating abdominal radiographs after emptying the urinary bladder and abdominal ultrasound.

Abdomen: cranial VD view
Abdomen: cranial VD view
Abdomen: caudal VD view
Abdomen: caudal VD view