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College of Veterinary Medicine

Anatomy and Physiology

Clarenburg Lecture Series Past Lectures

Dr. Irving H. Zucker, Ph.D.

Theodore F. Hubbard Professor of Cardiovascular Research, University of Nebraska Medical Center

Dr. Zucker will present a lecture: 
October 3, 2016 at 4:30 p.m. 
“Targeting Dorsal Root Ganglia in Cardiovascular Disease” 

The seminar will be held in the Mara Conference Center, Trotter Hall, College of Veterinary Medicine.

Irving H. Zucker

Irving H. Zucker, Ph.D. is the Theodore F. Hubbard Professor of Cardiovascular Research and Chairman of the Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. He has been Chairman since 1989. Dr. Zucker received his Ph.D. from New York Medical College in 1972.  He continued his post doctoral training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center where he became a faculty member in 1973.

Dr. Zucker has been involved in studies related to the neural regulation of cardiovascular function over the past 41 years. His studies have revolved around cardiovascular reflex control of sympathetic nerve activity in animal models of chronic heart failure. These investigations focus on the role of central mediators of sympathetic nerve activity such as angiotensin II, nitric oxide and oxidative stress. Dr. Zucker has published over 200 papers in this field and this work has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Heart Association. He is the PI of a Program Project currently in its 16th year of funding. He has been the recipient of a MERIT Award from the NHLBI, an Established Investigatorship from the American Heart Association, the Wiggers Award from the Cardiovascular Section of the American Physiological Society and the Carl Ludwig Award from the Neural Control and Autonomic Regulation Section of the American Physiological Society and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Academy of Cardiovascular Sciences. In 1993 he received the Outstanding Research and Creative Activity Award from the University of Nebraska. He serves on the editorial boards of 9 journals. 

In addition to his research, Dr. Zucker has been and is currently active in administrative activities for the American Physiological Society and the American Heart Association. He was a member of the National Research Committee of the American Heart Association. He is currently Editor-In-Chief of the American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology. He is a Past-President of the Association of Chairs of Departments of Physiology and a Past-President of the American Physiological Society. 

We appreciate that Dr. Zucker will present the Dr. Rudolf Clarenburg Lectureship in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University. We hope that you will attend his lecture.

Dr. Alicia McDonough, Ph.D.

Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California

Dr. McDonough will present a lecture: 
May 4, 2015 at 4:30 p.m. 
“Salt Transporters in the Kidney During Hypertension: Matching Na Output to Na Intake”

The seminar will be held in the Mara Conference Center, Trotter Hall, College of Veterinary Medicine.

Alicia McDonough

Dr. Alicia McDonough is Professor of Cell and Neurobiology at the University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine.  The McDonough laboratory examines, at the cellular level, how the kidneys respond to hypertension to bring blood pressure and fluid volume back to normal, and why this response does not occur in chronic hypertension. For this body of work, Dr. McDonough was awarded the Ernest H. Starling Distinguished Lectureship from the American Physiological Society. Her lab also examines how the gut, muscles, and kidneys work together to maintain potassium balance, which affects blood pressure and kidney health. 

The McDonough lab initiated studies to determining the renal mechanisms responsible for regulation of sodium, blood pressure, and potassium balance, and how homeostasis is disrupted in disease states and corrected therapeutically.  By investigating ion transporters’ phosphorylation, abundance, subcellular distribution and activity, the lab has more recently defined how stimuli such as dietary sodium and potassium, AngII, injury, and cytokines increase renal sodium transport, and how the resultant hypertension provokes intrarenal responses to decrease sodium reabsorption (via pressure natriuresis).   

Dr. McDonough earned an A.B. in Physiology at the University of California Berkeley, a Ph.D. in Physiology at the University of Hawaii, and was a Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of California San Francisco Cardiovascular Research Institute and at Columbia University under the mentorships PS Timiras, SK Hong and IS Edelman, respectively. 

Dr. McDonough was an American Heart Association Established Investigator recipient and is active in the Kidney and Cardiovascular Disease Council. She has received two Outstanding Teacher awards for instructing first- and second-year Keck Medical students in renal physiology.

We appreciate that Dr. McDonough will present the Dr. Rudolf Clarenburg Lectureship in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University. We hope that you will attend her lecture.

Dr. James Eberwine, Ph.D.

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Dr. Eberwine will present a lecture: 
December 9, 2013 at 3:30 p.m. 
“Emergent Properties of Single Cells: Dynamical Systems Analysis”

The seminar will be held in the Mara Conference Center, Trotter Hall, College of Veterinary Medicine.

Charles O. Elson

Dr. Eberwine is the Elmer Holmes Bobst Professor of Pharmacology at the University of Pennsylvania where he also serves as Co-Director of the PENN Genome Frontiers Institute. Dr. Eberwine coined the phrase “expression profile” to describe the relative abundances of RNAs. Further he and his colleagues were the first to identify the large complexity of RNAs that are targeted to neuronal dendrites; directly demonstrate protein synthesis in dendrites; prove that membrane proteins could be synthesized in dendrites and inserted into the membrane to form functional receptors; identify the largest verified lists of in vivo RNA cargoes for specific RNA binding proteins; to demonstrate the capacity for and functional requirement for dendritic splicing of RNAs and to show that RNA expression profiles could be transferred between cells carrying their phenotypic memory with them. These research accomplishments were possible because of technology developed by Dr. Eberwine including: single cell PCR, the aRNA procedure, the phototransfection methodology, the PAIR procedure and the functional genomics TIPeR methodology as well as other single cell analysis technologies. Dr. Eberwine is an inventor on over sixty patents and has founded three biotech companies while serving on the Scientific Advisory Board for three additional companies. Dr. Eberwine has served as a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors for NIDA and is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for the EP Abraham Trust Fund of Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Oxford University.

Dr. Eberwine originated and directed the Cold Spring Harbor Summer Course formerly entitled “Cloning of Neural Genes” and now called “Advanced Techniques in Neuroscience”. Dr. Eberwine has directed or taught in this course 19 times over its’ 24year history. In 2012, he developed and Co-Directed the first Cold Spring Harbor Course on “Single Cell Techniques”. Dr. Eberwine has taught molecular biology in courses around the World including in Mexico, Germany, England and Brazil.

Dr. Eberwine has given many named lectureships and received various awards for his scientific accomplishments including a NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Award, a MERIT award from NIH, the NIH Pioneer Award, an Ellison Foundation Senior Scholar Award and the McKnight Technological Innovations in Neuroscience Award.

We appreciate that Dr. Eberwine will present the Dr. Rudolf Clarenburg Lectureship in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University. We hope that you will attend his lecture.

Charles O. Elson III, M.D.

Professor of Medicine and Microbiology
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Dr. Elson will present a lecture:
September 20, 2012 at 3:30 p.m.
“Maintaining Immunologic Peace with Microbiota”

The seminar will be held in the Mara Conference Center, Trotter Hall, College of Veterinary Medicine

Charles O. ElsonDr. Charles O. Elson, M.D., is the Basil I. Hirschowitz Chair of Gastroenterology, Professor of Medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology and a professor in the Department of Microbiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He received his M.D. from Washington University in St. Louis, trained in Internal Medicine at New York Hospital/Cornell, then did his Gastroenterology fellowship at the University of Chicago. After doing full-time research in immunology at N.I.H., he joined the Faculty of the Division of Gastroenterology at the Medical College of Virginia. He moved to the University of Alabama at Birmingham to become the Director of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, and subsequently served as Vice-Chair for Research in the Department of Medicine. He holds the Basil I. Hirschowitz Chair in Gastroenterology and is an active consultant in immune-mediated intestinal disorders.

The author of numerous peer-reviewed manuscripts, reviews, and book chapters, Dr. Elson has held major positions in national organizations, and has served on a number of advisory boards, including the Advisory Council of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

He has been elected to many of the most outstanding professional societies in the field of academic medicine, and has a long history of service to the Society for Mucosal Immunology for which he is a co-founder and past president.

The central focus of the Elson laboratory is on the regulation of mucosal immune responses, particularly the mucosal immune response to the microbiota, which represent the largest mass of antigen encountered by the immune system. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that maintain mucosal immune homeostasis are being defined. When these mechanisms fail, pathogenic effector T cells are generated that result in colitis. Dr Elson and co-workers have cloned a set of immunodominant antigens of the microbiota that stimulate such pathogenic T cells and result in inflammatory bowel disease. Among these cloned antigens, previously unknown bacterial flagellins have emerged as a major cluster. Seroreactivity to these flagellins is found in multiple experimental models of colitis in mice and in half of patients with Crohn’s disease. These antigens drive a newly described CD4 T cell effector subset making IL-17 (Th17) which appears to be responsible for disease progression. A T cell receptor transgenic mouse reactive to the flagellins has been generated and is being used to study the innate and adaptive immune response to microbiota antigens. A second major effort is in the identification of T reg cells in the intestine that recognize microbial antigens and maintain homeostasis. The mechanisms whereby such cells are induced are being defined and the application of these cells to prevent or treat intestinal inflammation are being tested.

We appreciate that Dr. Elson will present the Dr. Rudolf Clarenburg Lectureship in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University. We hope that you will attend his lecture.

Scott T. Brady, Ph.D.

Professor and Department Head
Department of Anatomy & Cell Biology
University of Illinois at Chicago

Dr. Brady presented a lecture:
September 19th, 2011 at 3:30 p.m.
“Life in the Fast Lane: Axonal Transport, Kinases and Neurodegeneration”

The seminar was held in the Mara Conference Center – Trotter Hall

Scott Brady

Dr. Brady received his undergraduate training at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA, where he earned bachelor's degrees in both Physics and Biology in 1973. At the University of Southern California he earned a Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology in 1978, where he began his studies on the mechanisms of axonal transport in the laboratory of Dr. William McClure. Dr. Brady then moved to Case Western Reserve University for postdoctoral training in Neuroscience with Dr. Raymond Lasek from 1978-1981. He remained at CWRU as a research faculty member in the Department of Anatomy until 1985, and then moved to the Department of Cell Biology at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. He remained in Dallas until 2001 when he moved to the University of Illinois at Chicago where he is currently Professor and Head of the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology.

In the early 1980's, Dr. Brady began doing summer research at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA where he used live-cell imaging to study fast axonal transport. In collaboration with Drs. Robert Allen and Ray Lasek, he developed a novel preparation for study of transport based on digital microscopy of isolated axoplasm from the squid giant axon. Using these methods, Dr. Brady first showed that fast axonal transport depended on a new class of molecular motor and was one of the discoverers of the kinesin family of molecular motors. Subsequently, Dr. Brady's research has focused on cell and molecular biology of kinesins in neurons, making significant contributions to our understanding of the structure, regulation and molecular biology of the kinesins. His current research includes a focus on the role that axonal transport and regulation of molecular motors play in adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease

We are grateful that Dr. Brady presented the Dr. Rudolf Clarenburg Lectureship in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University.

Jochen Schacht, Ph.D.

Professor of Biological Chemistry in Otolaryngology
Director, Kresge Hearing Research Institute, University of Michigan

Dr. Schacht presented a lecture:
September 27, 2010 at 3:30 p.m.
“Hearing and Hearing Loss: from Bench and Bedside”

The seminar was held in the Mara Conference Center – Trotter Hall 

Jochen Schacht

Dr. Schacht received his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Heidelberg, Germany, and joined the University of Michigan in 1969 where he is now Professor of Biological Chemistry in Otolaryngology and Director of the Kresge Hearing Research Institute.

The goal of Dr. Schacht’s research is to determine the causes and help prevent acquired hearing loss. Other research efforts include biochemical and biological studies of cell communication and regulatory mechanisms in the inner ear, cell survival and apoptotic pathways in drug-induced hearing loss, noise trauma and age-related hearing impairment, and environmental factors that cause deafness.

Dr. Schacht has served on scientific review and strategic planning committees for the National Institutes of Health and is a member of the editorial boards of several professional journals. He has received numerous national and international honors for his work, including the University of Michigan’s Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award, and was elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

We are grateful that Dr. Schacht will present The Dr. Rudolf Clarenburg Lectureship in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University. We hope that you will attend his lecture.
 

Casey T. Weaver, M.D.

Wyatt and Susan Haskell Endowed Professor in Medical Excellence
School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Dr. Weaver will present a lecture:
November 9, 2009 at 3:30 p.m.
“The Emergence of the Th17 Pathway; Implications for Host Protection and Autoimmunity”

The seminar will be held in the Practice Management Center – Trotter Hall
 

Casey T. Weaver

Dr. Weaver received his M.D. with honors in 1984 from the University of Florida in Gainesville and his board certification from the American Board of Pathology in Anatomic Pathology in 1993.

The goal of Dr. Weaver’s research is advancement in understanding mechanisms by which CD4 T cells develop into distinct functional subsets and how these subsets control immune responses. Dr. Weaver’s group has pioneered methods for defining and tracking CD4 T cell development and modeling of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Additional research efforts are focused on three interrelated themes: the molecular mechanisms that controls developmental decisions that specify Th17 and Treg development; delineation of mechanisms by which innate immune cells respond to pathogenic and commensal bacteria to shape Th17 versus Treg development; and a dissection of contributions of cis regulatory elements in controlling key cytokines produced by CD4 T cells – all with a view towards defining novel interventions to better prevent or treat immune-mediated diseases.

We are grateful that Dr. Weaver will present The Dr. Rudolf Clarenburg Lectureship in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University. We hope that you will attend his lectures.

Colin G. Nichols, Ph.D.

Washington University School of Medicine

Dr. Nichols will present two lectures:
October 27, 2008 at 3:30 p.m.
“The Molecular Basis of Potassium ATP Channel Activity”

October 28, 2008 at 10:00 a.m.
“Electrical Signaling: from Molecules to Malaise”

Both seminars will be held in the Practice Management Center – Trotter Hall
 

Colin G. Nichols Colin G. Nichols, Ph.D., is the Carl Cori Professor in the Department of Cell Biology and Physiology at Washington University School of Medicine. He received a BSc in Biochemistry and Physiology, and a Ph.D. in Physiology, from Leeds University in England. He then completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Physiology at the University of Maryland and joined the Washington University School of Medicine faculty in 1991.

Dr. Nichols’ research focuses on the biology of ion channels, and their role in linking cellular metabolism to electrical activity in various tissues. His major discoveries have included the molecular mechanism of inward rectification, and the electrical basis of neonatal diabetes. Supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the American Diabetes Association, he was also an Established Investigator of the American Heart Association, and an inaugural honoree as a Fellow of the American Heart Association. He has served on the editorial boards of Biophysical Journal, Circulation Research, Journal of General Physiology and Channels. He has also served as Chair of the Membrane Biophysics Sub-Group of the Biophysical Society, and as President of the Society of General Physiologists.

For more information about Dr. Nichols please visit his webpage at http://www.nicholslab.wustl.edu/

We are grateful that Dr. Nichols will present The Dr. Rudolf Clarenburg Lectureship in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University. We hope that you will attend his lectures.

Robert J. Genco, D.D.S., Ph.D.

University at Buffalo, State University at New York

Dr. Genco will present two lectures:
April 14, 2008 at 4:00 p.m.
"Oral and Systemic Disease: Crossing the Barriers of Interdisciplinary Research in Academic Health Centers"

April 15, 2008 at 2:00 p.m.
"Transfer of University Discoveries to Society: New Approaches and Early Results at the University at Buffalo"

Both seminars will be held in the Practice Management Center - Trotter Hall

Robert J. Genco

Dr. Genco received his D.D.S. cum laude, from the State University of New York at the Buffalo School of Dentistry in 1963. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, in Microbiology and Immunology in 1967 and completed residency training in periodontology at the University of Pennsylvania in 1967.

Dr. Genco is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, and in the Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He also is a Professor in The Department of Immunology at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Dr. Genco has been a member of the Institute of Medicine. National Academy of Sciences since 1988.

Dr. Genco's research and clinical activities focus on studies of oral infections, specifically the role of oral flora in periodontal diseases. Most recently, Dr. Genco has been studying the effects of oral infections on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, as well as the effects of oral infection on glycemic control and complications of diabetes mellitus including cardiovascular and kidney disease.

Dr. Genco is the Vice Provost responsible for the University at Buffalo Office of Science, Technology Transfer, and Economic Outreach (STOR). STOR promotes economic revitalization through transfer and economic outreach activities. and fosters partnerships between the university and the business community.

Peter C. Agre, M.D.

2003 Nobel Laureate
Duke University

Peter C. Agre, M.D.

Dr. Peter Agre received his medical doctorate from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1974. Dr. Agre’s postgraduate training included a residency in internal medicine at Case Western Reserve University and a fellowship in hematology/oncology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  In 1981, he returned to Johns Hopkins, where in 1993 he advanced to professor of biological chemistry. In 2000 Dr. Agre was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2003.

In 2003, Dr. Agre shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for revealing the molecular basis for the movement of water into and out of cells.  His 1992 paper in the journal Science, with Johns Hopkins physiologist Bill Guggino, Ph.D., documented the discovery of the first water-channel protein – called an aquaporin – which facilitates the movement of water molecules into and out of cells through the cell membrane. Since then, Agre and his colleagues have found aquaporins to be part of the blood-brain barrier and also associated with water transport in skeletal muscle, lung and kidney. Researchers worldwide now study aquaporins, and have linked aberrant water transport to many human disorders.

Currently, Dr. Agre serves as vice chancellor for science and technology at Duke University Medical Center.

William B. Guggino, PhD

The Johns Hopkins University

Dr. Guggino’s lecture will be on April 3, 2007 at 4:00 p.m.:

“Macromolecular Complexes Directing the Trafficking of CFTR from the Golgi to the Plasma Membrane”

The seminar will be held in the Practice Management Center, Trotter Hall, College of Veterinary Medicine. Refreshments will be served at 3:30 p.m. Dr. William B. Guggino, PhD
Dr. Guggino received his Ph.D. in 1978 from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. His research interests include cystic fibrosis, polycystic kidney disease, gene therapy, epithelial cell biology, protein-protein interactions, ion channels, and protein localization. Dr. Guggino is Director of Physiology and also Director of the Cystic Fibrosis Research Development Center at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Guggino’s work on cystic fibrosis was recognized when he won the prestigious Doris F. Tulcin Cystic Fibrosis Research Award.

Dr. Guggino’s laboratory is involved in understanding the biology of cystic fibrosis and seeks to identify methods to treat or prevent the disease. Studies in his laboratory focus on understanding the molecular structure of the protein that is mutated to cause cystic fibrosis and to determine how this protein affects cellular function by its interaction with other proteins and by its function as an ion channel. His laboratory and the Cystic Fibrosis Research Center, are actively involved in testing and developing vectors that are used in human and animal gene therapy trials. Research is also being conducted to identify specific defects in anion channel regulation in cystic fibrosis patients.

In 1992, Dr. Guggino, along with Dr. Peter Agre, authored a seminal paper in Science, which detailed the discovery of the very first water-channel protein.

We are grateful that Dr. Guggino will present The Dr. Rudolf Clarenburg Lectureship in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University. We hope that you will attend his lecture.

Mark A. Knepper, MD, Ph.D

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH
Bethesda, Maryland. His lectures will be:

"Aquaporins in Health and Disease"  November 29, 2006 at 4:00 p.m.

The seminar will be held in the Practice Management Center, Trotter Hall, College of Veterinary Medicine. Refreshments will be served at 3:30 p.m.

Mark A. Knepper, MD, Ph.D

Dr. Knepper received his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from Case Western University in 1975, and his M.D. in 1976. His research interests include proteomics, renal function, epithelial function and biomedical engineering. He has published over 325 journal articles and book chapters on these subjects.

Dr. Knepper’s laboratory uses a systems biology approach to discover the fundamental mechanisms involved in regulation of the transport of water, urea and ions by the kidney, and to discover how these regulatory processes are altered in various clinically important fluid and electrolyte disorders. A major current emphasis is on regulatory systems involved in controlling water excretion by the kidney including mechanisms of aquaporin-2 regulation and the role of urea transporters in the urinary concentrating mechanism. Studies are also being conducted on the molecular basis of disordered renal NaCl transport in hypertension and congestive heart failure.


We are grateful that Dr. Knepper will present The Dr. Rudolf Clarenburg Lectureship in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University.

Dr. Avril Somlyo

Dr. Avril Somlyo

The molecular mechanisms of excitation-contraction coupling, contractile regulation and the basis of contraction in mammalian smooth and cardiac muscle in normal and pathological states are long-term interests of our laboratory. We are currently working on a signal transduction pathway in smooth muscle, which is activated when physiological transmitters or drugs bind to cell membrane receptors and lead to a marked increase in the sensitivity of the contractile proteins to calcium (Ca2+-sensitization). We have found that this G-protein-coupled process, which operates under physiological conditions, inhibits myosin light chain phosphatase, resulting in an increased population of phosphorylated (activated), cycling myosin motors. The phosphatase is a trimeric complex with a 130 kDa subunit which targets the activity to myosin. Current biochemical and molecular biological studies are directed to establishing the messengers between the membrane receptors/G-proteins and the myosin-associated phosphatase, as well as elucidating the mechanism of inhibition of the enzyme.

We are grateful that Dr. Somlyo will present the Rudy Clarenburg Lecture Series in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University. We hope you will attend her lectures.

Dr. Jim Riviere

Dr. Jim Riviere

"My primary research focus is the development of pharmacokinetic models to quantitate the absorption and transport of drugs and chemicals across the skin. These studies utilize in vitro and in vivo experimental models in pigs, as well as computer simulations, for ultimate extrapolation to humans. Results of these studies have been used to develop novel transdermal drug delivery approaches as well as revise risk assessment approaches for topical chemical exposure to occupational and environmental chemicals. In the veterinary arena, this approach is applied to Food Safety in the prediction of drug and chemical residues in the edible tissues of food producing animals."

We are grateful that Dr. Riviere has accepted the invitation to present the Rudy Clarenburg Lecture Series here in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University.

Dr. Jeanne M. Nerbonne

Alumni Endowed Professor of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.

  

Dr. Jeanne Nerbonne

Research in Dr. Nerbonne’s laboratory is focused primarily on delineating the mechanisms involved in the regulation and modulation of voltage gated ion channels in cardiac myocytes and cortical neurons. In myocytes, her interest is in the Ca++ independent depolarization activated K+ channels that determine the height and the duration of the cardiac action potential. In addition to examining the electrophysiological properties of these channels, she is exploring the molecular basis of the functional diversity of K+ channels found in cardiac cells and the molecular mechanisms controlling the regulation of functional K+ channel expression in the normal as well as the diseased heart. She is also exploring dominant negative strategies to effect the functional knockout of K+ channels in the mouse heart and examining the physiological and pathophysiological consequences of these manipulations.

Dr. Michael J. Welsh

Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Roy J. Carver Chair in Internal Medicine and Physiology and Biophysics, Department of Internal Medicine, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA. His lectures will be:

"A Novel Family of Non-Voltage Gated Sodium Channels as Receptors for Mechanosensation, Nociception, and Salt Taste"
Wednesday, October 23, 2002, 4p.m. Practice Management Center, 4th Floor, Trotter Hall

"Pursuing Cystic Fibrosis in Search of Understanding and New Treatments"
Thursday, October 24, 2002, 9:30a.m.  Practice Management Center, 4th Floor, Trotter Hall

Dr. Michael Welsh

Dr. Welsh is presently a Professor of Physiology and Biophysics in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Iowa.

Dr. Gerald F. DiBona, MD

Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA. His lectures will be:

"Contrasts in Biomedical Research and Health Care: Sweden and USA." Monday, April 29, 2002 4:00 p.m.
Practice Management Center, 4th Floor, Trotter Hall

"Neural Control of the Kidney."
Tuesday, April 30, 2002 10:00 a.m.
Practice Management Center, 4th Floor, Trotter Hall

Dr. Gerald DiBona

Dr. Gerald DiBona is presently a Professor of Physiology and Biophysics in the Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Iowa.

We are grateful that Dr. DiBona has accepted the invitation to present the Rudy Clarenburg Lecture Series here at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University.

Dr. George A. Brooks

The Department of Anatomy & Physiology College of Veterinary Medicine present the Rudy Clarenburg Distinguished Lecture Series. This spring's lecture series features Dr. George A. Brooks. Dr. George Brooks will be presenting two lecture series on Monday, March 12 and Tuesday, March 13 at the Practice Management Center, Trotter Hall at 4:00 PM.

March 12: "Fuel Utilization During Exercise: The Crossover Concept."
March 13: "Exercise Substrate Utilization: The Lactate Shuttle."
   


Dr. George BrooksDr. George A. Brooks is presently Professor and Director of the Exercise Physiology Laboratory in the Department of Integrative Biology at the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Brooks received his PhD from the University of Michigan in 1970 and then completed a Post-Doctoral Fellowship at Muscle Biology Research Laboratory located at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Brooks is an established, internationally recognized muscle physiologist. He has been continually funded by the NIH for nearly 25 years and has published over 175 manuscripts in top-quality peer-reviewed physiology and biochemistry journals. We are grateful that Dr. Brooks has accepted the invitation to present the Rudy Clarenburg Lecture Series here in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University. For more information about Dr. Brooks, you can view his webpage at http://ib.berkeley.edu/labs/brooks/

Dr. Arthur "Buzz" Brown

Thursday, November 18, 1999
Seminar Title: "Ion Channels in Hereditary and Acquired Heart Disease"

Friday, November 19, 1999
Seminar Title: "Protein Modulators of Voltage-Dependent K+ Channels"

Dr. Arthur Brown


Dr. Brown received his PhD degree in 1964 from the University of London, London, England. He went on to work as a Research Fellow with the Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California Medical Center in San Francisco, California. Dr. Brown is now the Vice President for Research at The Rammelkamp Center for Education and Research, MetroHealth Medical Center and Professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.

Dr. Brown is an internationally renowned authority on ion channel regulation in health and disease. His laboratory is remarkable for its ability to investigate problems in cardiovascular pharmacology from cell to bedside. Dr. Brown’s laboratory was one of the first to demonstrate direct G-protein modulation of ion channels, and suggest physiological significance for these rapid signaling pathways. Recently, his lab has been active in efforts to identify non-cardiac drugs that can induce life-threatening rhythm disturbances in human patients, and define the molecular bases of the cardiotoxicities.

Dr. Brown will deliver two public lectures at the College of Veterinary Medicine as part of the Clarenburg Lecture Series. The first entitled "Ion Channels in Hereditary and Acquired Heart Disease" will be given on Thursday, November 18th at 4PM and the second, entitled "Protein Modulators of Voltage-Dependent K+ Channels" will be given on Friday, November 19th at 4PM. Both lectures will be held at the College of Veterinary Medicine’s Practice Management Center, 4th Floor, Trotter Hall.

Franzini-Armstrong

Dr. Clara Franzini-Armstrong

Dr. Clara Franzini-Armstrong is a world-renowned electron microscopist. She is nationally and internationally recognized for her superb ultra-structural studies of the triad junction of both cardiac and skeletal muscle. Her contributions have greatly enhanced our knowledge of the structural basis for excitation-contraction coupling. Dr. Franzini Armstrong's work has revealed that ion channel proteins in the T-tubule (the dihydropyridine receptor) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (ryanodine receptor) are intimately and precisely associated. The interactions between these two proteins provide the basis for control of calcium release from intracellular stores, which regulates muscle contraction.

Dr. Franzini-Armstrong received her PhD degree in 1960 from the University of Pisa, Italy. She went to work as a Research Assistant at University College, London, under direction of Nobel laureate, Andrew F. Huxley. She joined the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania as an Associate Professor in Anatomy in 1975 and was promoted to Professor in Cellular and Developmental Biology in 1981. Dr. Franzini-Armstrong was inducted into the National Academy of Sciences in 1995. She and her husband, Dr. Clay Armstrong, are the only husband and wife members of the National Academy of Science.
 
Dr. Franzini-Armstrong delivered two public lectures at the College of Veterinary Medicine as part of the Clarenburg Lecture Series. The first, entitled "Molecular architecture of calcium release units", was given on Thursday, November 5th, 1998 at 4 PM in Room 235 of the Veterinary Medical Science Building and the second, entitled "Design principles of skeletal and cardiac muscle", was held at 4 PM Friday, November 6th, 1998 in the Practice Management Center, 4th Floor, Trotter Hall.