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Lifelines

The official newsletter of the College of Veterinary Medicine

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July 2012 - Vol. 7, No. 7

Top Stories

Veterinary students go to TanzaniaTrip to Tanzania

A group of students fulfill a Veterinary Study Tour elective.

Why did they go there?

Tick Tips

*LIFELINES VIDEO FEATURE
Dr. Michael Dryden shares advice for handling a summer pest.
Why ticks are a year-round problem.

Pictures at a competition

Hannah Leventhal share images from Alltech Young Scientist Competition in Kentucky.
How high did she place?

Animal health corridor seminar at K-State Olathe

Biosafety and biocontainment training for BSL-3 laboratory workers at BRI

CVM unveils new 'Pet Friendly' license plate

New interns arrive on campus



Regular features

Joseph ChapesUnder the Microscope
Joseph Chapes, Technology Coordinator, Computing and Technology Services

News Ticker

Calendar of events

New Arrivals/Recent Departures

Lifelines back issues

Hard copy version of Lifelines (printable)
Note: File is in Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format.
Some documents are in PDF format.
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Trip to Tanzania

Zoonotic diseases provide focus for student tour in Africa

  The veterinary study tour group stops at a farm being assisted by the Heifer International program. From left, Mark Brunson, Andrea Olson, the farmers, Dr. Rose McMurphy, Allison Ten and Laura Keller.
 
  The veterinary study tour group stops at a farm being assisted by the Heifer International program. From left, Mark Brunson, Andrea Olson, the farmers, Dr. Rose McMurphy, Allison Ten and Laura Keller.  
     
  Elephants  
  Elephants roam at the Ngorongoro Crater.  

This past May, Dr. Rose McMurphy, section head in anesthesiology in the Clinical Sciences department, took a small group of veterinary students to Tanzania as part of the International Veterinary Study Tour elective. The goals of the elective were to gain an understanding of the challenges of raising livestock in a developing country, to identify the predominant zoonotic diseases and their impact on a community, to discuss the impact, both positive and negative, of ecotourism and to recognize problems associated with wildlife conservation in a country with limited financial resources. The elective course involved both didactic instruction before the trip and a 10 day tour of northern Tanzania.

“It is difficult to know what the impact of this tour might have on each individual student,” Dr. McMurphy said. “Certainly getting to visit a place as beautiful as the Serengeti cannot be discounted, but I think the greatest impact comes from meeting the people of Tanzania and an appreciation of daily life in a country where over 80 percent of the population lives below the international poverty line.”

During the early days of the tour, the group met with Simon Sandilen, a logistics officer with Heifer International – Tanzania. Sandilen accompanied the students on a visit to four remote farms in the area surrounding Mt. Meru. Heifer International has been working in Tanzania for several decades and has been instrumental in providing instruction in breeding and caring for livestock, including cattle, donkeys (for hauling water), goats, chicken, and fish and in methods of organic farming and biogas production.

The next part of the itinerary included a journey to Karatu, where the students toured a medical clinic and dropped off donations of medical supplies collected at the K-State College of Veterinary Medicine. The clinic is part of a registered charity through the Foundation for African Medicine and Education. Other cultural interactions included a hike at the Olmoti Crater with two local Masai men and a visit to a Masai village, where the group was welcomed with a traditional dance. One of the members of the village gave the group a tour of a Masai hut and the boma (corral made from brush) where the cattle are kept. The milk and blood from the cattle are the predominant food for the Masai people.

The trip finished with several days of game drives in the national parks, including the famed Serengeti and Ngorongoro Crater. The list of wildlife species viewed was “endless” but highlights included numerous leopards, lions and elephants, and witnessing thousands of wildebeest and zebras on their annual migration in the Serengeti.


The group stops at Gol Kopjes in Serengeti ; from left, Mark Brunson, Allison Ten, Andrea Olson, Lauren Keller and Dr. Rose McMurphy.
The group stops at Gol Kopjes in Serengeti ; from left, Mark Brunson, Allison Ten, Andrea Olson, Lauren Keller and Dr. Rose McMurphy.

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Video Report

Protecting pets from ticks this summer

For pet owners in the Midwest, summer can be a great time to enjoy the outdoors with their animals. Unfortunately, it can also mean risking an encounter with a tick. A mild winter and warm spring has contributed to an unparalleled tick population in 2012, as noted by Dr. Michael Dryden, a University Distinguished Professor of Veterinary Parasitology at Kansas State University, who has studied ticks for over 20 years.

“This has really been a remarkable tick season,” Dr. Dryden said. “Typically during a really hard winter, these ticks are really suppressed and you can really have some significant kill of these tick populations. That just did not happen this year. So we saw ticks starting to become a problem in early February. They kind of roared through March and April and May and just continued out of control and many different tick species as well. We were seeing Lone Star ticks; we were seeing American dog ticks; we were seeing Gulf Coast ticks — it was pretty remarkable.”

Watch the full report in the video below:

 
 

Ticks are a year-round challenge.
Ticks are a year-round challenge. See the video report for tips on protecting your pet.


Video produced by Joseph Chapes and Kent Nelson, technology coordinators from
Computing and Technical Support (CATS).

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Leventhal wins second place at science competition

  Dr. Inge Russell and Dr. Mark Lyons from Alltech present the second place prize to Hannah Leventhal. The undergraduate division prize also includes a $3,000 scholarship prize.  
 
Dr. Inge Russell and Dr. Mark Lyons from Alltech present the second place prize to Hannah Leventhal. The undergraduate division prize also includes a $3,000 scholarship.
 

Last month, we reported that second-year student Hannah Leventhal was selected as the United States Zone and North America first place winner for the Alltech Young Scientist Award. As a prize, she was invited to compete on a global level at the competition in Lexington Kentucky. Hannah submitted pictures from the competition where she earned a second-place prize. Congratulations, Hannah!

Hannah with her presentation.
Hannah presents “The addition of Megasphaera elsdenii to in vitro cultures of equine cecal microorganisms fed starch or fructan.”

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Animal health corridor seminar at K-State Olathe

  K-State Olathe campus  
  K-State Olathe Campus  

The next presentation in Kansas State University’s Animal Health Corridor Lecture Series, “The Quality Unit and Its Relationship to Evolving FDA and USDA Regulations,” will be at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, July 19, on the university’s Olathe campus, 22201 W. Innovation Drive.

“There are many new and upcoming FDA and USDA regulations that industry professionals in the corridor need to understand in order to effectively manage quality in biologics and pharmaceuticals,” said Dr. Jim McCord, a veterinarian and quality director at Ceva Biomune. “This seminar will explore questions and issues surrounding the interface of quality assurance and regulatory affairs, both in these national agencies and in international arenas.”

Drs. McCord and Miguel A. de Soto-Perera, director, managing consultant at Beckloff Associates Inc., a Cardinal Health Company, will share their perspectives and expertise on these topics as featured speakers.

Tickets are $50 per person and cover the seminar and lunch. Group rates are available. For more information or to RSVP, visit http://www.ageconomics.k-state.edu/outreach or contact Kara Ross at 785-532-3526 or kross@agecon.k-state.edu.

The Animal Health Corridor Lecture Series is an initiative of the Animal Health Supply Chain Program offered through Kansas State University’s department of agricultural economics in partnership with K-State Olathe. The lecture series contributes toward the greater mission of the Animal Health Supply Chain Program to enhance the competitiveness of the animal health industry and its supply chain through professional development programs and industry-focused economic and strategy research and analysis.


 

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Biosafety and biocontainment training at BRI

  Dr. Richard Oberst, left, leads a tour through the Biosecurity Research Institute in this file photo from 2008.  
  Dr. Richard Oberst, left, leads a tour through the Biosecurity Research Institute in this file photo from 2008.  

The National Biosafety and Biocontainment Training Program and Kansas State University Biosecurity Research Institute are offering a five-day series of courses in biosafety and biocontainment for BSL-3 laboratory workers, Sept. 10-14. These courses are designed for biosafety professionals, researchers and laboratorians to enhance individual knowledge and meet the scientific, regulatory, biocontainment, biosafety and engineering challenges associated with working in a biocontainment facility. Topics include:
•Introduction to microbiology essentials
•Principles of biosafety and biocontainment
•The biological risk assessment process
•Laboratory sterilization and disinfection
•Emergency planning and response
•Laboratory regulations, standards and guidelines
•Biocontainment laboratory security
•Introduction to animal biocontainment
•Packaging and Shipping Division 6.2 Hazardous Materials
•Hands-on sessions using laboratory equipment

Successful completion of the courses is a prerequisite for completion of a basic level certificate in biosafety and biocontainment, and for participation in advanced and comprehensive level certificate programs.

National Biosafety and Biocontainment Training Program is authorized by IACET to offer 4.0 continuing education units. To receive these units, participants are required to score a minimum of 70 percent on each post-course knowledge assessment. The course also offers certified industrial hygienists the opportunity to earn certification maintenance points.

Get registration information by calling 785-539-7531.

 

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New ‘Pet Friendly’ License Plate

The College of Veterinary Medicine has unveiled a new way to support Kansas Shelter Medicine. The Pet Friendly license plate will be made available to Kansas residents early/mid summer 2012. For information, see www.vet.k-state.edu/depts/development/license.htm, call 1-855-269-7387 or e-mail: petplate@vet.k-state.edu.

Pet Friendly license plate

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New interns arrive on campus

The Veterinary Health Center welcomed new interns in June. Back row, left to right: Dr. Nathan Canada, Dr. Leslie Moore, Dr. Kristen O’Connell and Dr. Autumn Harris Front row: Dr. Jessie Monday, Dr. Drew Humphries and Dr. Katie Delk.
The Veterinary Health Center welcomed new interns in June.
Back row, left to right: Dr. Nathan Canada, Dr. Leslie Moore, Dr. Kristen O’Connell and Dr. Autumn Harris
Front row, left to right: Dr. Jessie Monday, Dr. Drew Humphries and Dr. Katie Delk.

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Under the Microscope

Joseph Chapes, Technology Coordinator, Computing and Technology Services

 

Joseph Chapes Hometown:  Manhattan, Kan.

Family information: My dad, Dr. Stephen K. Chapes, mom, Lou Ann, and sister, Angela, all live in Manhattan. My brother, Stephen, works as an architectural engineer in San Jose, Calif.

Pets: We currently have five dogs at my house. From largest to smallest: Chance, a German Shepherd mix, Charlie, a white mutt of some sort, Heidi, a dachshund, and Ross and Spice, a pair of Yorkies.

Which animals have been the most fun or interesting to work with? When we created a video with Dr. Mark Weiss, it was fun to get to know the genetically-modified rats that his lab created. I also enjoyed creating a video about Fertis, the college’s fistulated steer, at this year’s open house. Of course, it’s always fascinating to work with Dr. Michael Dryden to shoot close-up footage of ticks and fleas. 

What kind of collections do you have? I’m a huge science fiction fan and a have a large collection of Star Trek books, toys and other collectables. I often enjoy playing board games with friends, including several types of RISK. I have combined these interests to create a version of RISK based on Star Trek, which can be downloaded online. Of course, I also enjoy creating videos.

How did you celebrate Independence Day? I had a pretty relaxed holiday. I went to see “Brave,” the new Pixar film, with my sister and spent the evening blowing up money with friends. It was a pretty good day, in my opinion.

What has been the biggest challenge about the triple-digit heat this summer? I often try to walk to work when it’s nice, but since it’s been so hot the last couple of weeks, I’ve been a wimp and took my car to work to avoid trudging uphill in the heat. It’s also difficult whenever my dogs start wanting to go for a walk in the afternoon or early evening. It’s hard to say no.

If you could have a superpower, what would it be? I wish I could fly into space like Superman. With this power I could fly to the moon or beyond. That would be pretty awesome.

What is something you would like to do before the students return for the fall semester?  I would like to go on a trip, which I plan to do. My brother and I are planning on taking a weeklong trip to Glacier National Park. It will be nice to get away before the semester begins.

Will you watch the Olympics and which sport is your favorite? I don’t think I have a favorite Olympic sport, but the sand volleyball competitions are always fun to watch.

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News Ticker

Dr. James W. Carpenter’s exotic animal formulary book was “Book of the Day” listed on an Italian conference website.

Dr. Fernando Pierucci-Alves received a $20,000 Innovative Research Award through the Johnson Cancer Research Center at K-State for his project titled: “TGF-beta signaling in epithelia of the male excurrent system.”

Drs. Brad White, David Anderson and Derek Mosier, received a Merck Animal Health award for their project: “Determination of the potential mitigation of inflammatory factors in Bovine Respiratory Disease through use of florfenicol and flunixin meglumine.”

Drs. Dudley McCaw, and Mary Lynn Higginbotham received an award through BioMed Valley Discoveries Inc. for their project: “An Open-Label, Non-Randomized, Single Dose Exploratory Study to Evaluate the Safety and Effectiveness of Clostridium novyi-NT Spores in Spontaneous Canine Tumors Receiving Radiation Therapy.”

 

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Calendar of events

Aug. 4-8: AVMA Convention, San Diego, Calif.
Aug. 22-28: Central Veterinary Conference, Kansas City, Mo.
Sept. 1: Cat Town - K-State vs. Missouri State
Sept. 8: Cat Town - K-State vs. Miami
Sept. 15: Cat Town - K-State vs. North Texas

 

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Recent Departures

Thanks and Goodbye to:

Dr. Meredyth Jones, Clinical Assistant Professor, Clinical Sciences
Dr. Michele Borgarelli, Associate Professor, Clinical Sciences
Bethany Plucinik, Senior Administrative Assistant, A&P
Heather Wedel, Senior Administrative Assistant, KSVDL
Justina Vanderlinde,
Senior Administrative Assistant, VHC
Dr. Sonya Wesselowski, Medical Resident Year 1, VHC
Jeffrey Gauss,
Librarian I, VML
Ruth Newton, Temporary Administrative Assistant, A&P

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Lifelines is published each month by the Development and Alumni Affairs Office at the College of Veterinary Medicine. The editors is Joe Montgomery, jmontgom@vet.k-state.edu.