Skip to the content

Kansas State University

  1. K-State home >
  2. College of Veterinary Medicine >
  3. Anatomy & Physiology >
  4. Professional Veterinary Medicine and Graduate Courses

Professional Veterinary Medicine and Graduate Courses

 

AP 601. Cardiorespiratory Exercise Physiology. (3) I. On sufficient demand. Intensive study of a selected topic in kinesiology involving either great in-depth study, or application of theory presented in a related course. May be repeated as topic varies. Pr.: 6 hrs in Kinesiology 500 and above. Only 6 hours may be counted toward degree. Cross-listed with Kinesiology. See KIN 796.

AP 603. Cardiovascular Exercise Physiology.(3) II. An examination of the structure and function of the respiratory system and the manner in which oxygen passes from the atmosphere to is site of utilization in the mitochondria. Exercise and environmental stresses will form the basis for examining the capacity, plasticity and limitations to respiratory function. Pr.: KIN 250 and 335. Cross listed with Kinesiology; see KIN 601.

AP 700. Gross Anatomy I. (5) I. Gross dissection of the dog with comparative aspects of the cat. Two hours lec. and nine hours lab a week. Pr.: First-year standing in College of Veterinary Medicine or consent of the instructor.

AP 705. Gross Anatomy II. (6) II. Gross dissection of the horse and ruminant with comparative aspects of the pig, laboratory animals, and the chicken. Three hours lec. and nine hours lab a week. Pr.: AP 700.

AP 710. Microscopic Anatomy I. (5) I. Origin, development, and microscopic structure and appearance of the cells and tissues of the animal body. Three hours lec. and six hours lab a week. Pr.: First-year standing in College of Veterinary Medicine.

AP 711. Stem Cells and Comparative Biomedicine. (2) II, S. Characteristics of major categories of stem cells. Applicable, or potential clinical uses, including their utilization in tissue engineering or targeted delivery of therapeutics.

AP 730. Cross-Course Integration I. (1) I. Vertical and horizontal integration among semester courses to improve student cognitive retention and understanding of core content. Structure-function relationships will be emphasized to facilitate student assimilation and provide clinical relevance to basic science content. Pr.: First-year standing in the College of Veterinary Medicine or consent of instructor.

AP 737. Veterinary Physiology I. (5) Function of the animal body at the cellular level, including nerve and muscle function. Basic pathophysiological mechanisms will be emphasized and correlated with clinical topics. Five hours lec./wk. Pr.: First-year standing in College of Veterinary Medicine or consent of instructor.

AP 740. Cross-Course Integration II. (1) II. Vertical and horizontal integration within and between semester courses to improve student cognitive retention and understanding of core content. Structure-function relationships will be emphasized to facilitate student assimilation and provide clinical relevance to basic science content. Pr.: AP 730 or consent of instructor.

AP 747. Veterinary Physiology II. (6) II. Function of the cardiovascular, endocrine, respiratory, renal, digestive, and reproductive systems of domestic animals with emphasis on physiologic control mechanisms, interrelationships of body systems, and criteria for evaluating animal health. Five hours lec. and three hours lab a week. Pr.: AP 737.

AP 770. Pharmacology I. (4) I. The basic principles of Pharmacology, the interactions of drugs and living systems including fundamental principles of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, receptor-coupling, and mechanisms of action. A systems-bases approach to drug classes will be emphasized. Four hours lec. a week. Pr.: AP 737 and 747 or equiv.

AP 772. Pharmacology II. (2) II.  The basic principles of Pharmacology, the relationship of drug actions and interactions on physiological principles and pathophysiological conditions. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and a system-based approach to drug classes will be emphasized. Two hours of lec. a week PR.: AP 770

AP 773. Bioinstrumentation Laboratory. (1) I. Practical experience with and evaluation of laboratory and clinical techniques related to electrodes, transducers, computer-based data acquisition and analysis. Three hours lab per week. Pr.: AP 747 or equiv., and conc. enrollment in EECE 772.

AP 780. Electives in Anatomy and Physiology (1-3)  I. Elective course work. Topics: Veterinary Medical Language Cognates and Etymology; Special Interest Anatomy for Veterinary Students; History of Veterinary Medicine; Practical Use and Interpretation of Veterinary Scientific Literature. Pr.: Professional veterinary student standing or consent of instructor

II. Elective course work. Topics: Three Dimensional Imaging Anatomy of the Dog; Special Interest Anatomy for Veterinary Students; Veterinary Neuroscience; Behavior of Domestic Animals; Comparative Embryology. Pr.: Professional veterinary student standing or consent of instructor.

S. Elective course work. Topics: Special Interest anatomy for Veterinary Students; Veterinary Medical Language Cognates and Etymology.  Pr.: Professional veterinary student standing or consent of instructor

AP 790. Problems in Anatomy and Physiology. (Var.) I, II, S. Introduction of undergraduate and M.S. graduate students to research involving various anatomical and physiological systems. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

AP 796. Topics in Exercise Physiology. (1-4) I, II, S. On sufficient demand. Selected topics in Exercise Physiology involving either greater in-depth study, or application of theory presented in a related course. May be repeated as topic varies. Cross listed with Kinesiology. See KIN 796.

AP 800. Advanced Physiology of Exercise. (3) II. Study of the structure and function of the cardiovascular system as it pertains to acute and chronic exercise. Topics include the control of blood pressure, vascular volume and blood flow during orthostasis and exercise. Pr.: KIN 250 and 335. Cross-listed with Kinesiology; see KIN 603.

AP 803. Seminar. (1)I, II, S. Designed primarily for graduate and senior students enrolled for graduate credit in physiology. Each student is required to give a report on some subject related to physiology. The course is intended to stimulate interest in research and evaluation of data. One hour a week. Pr.: Consent of staff.

AP 825. Special Anatomy. (Var.) I, II, S. The gross and/or microscopic study of any system (or systems) of any domestic animal. Pr.: AP 700 or 710 or equiv. and consent of staff.

AP 850. Stem Cell Techniques. (2) I, S. Cellular and molecular techniques and techniques on tissue culture.

AP 861. Ultra structural Interpretation of the Nervous System. (3) II. Study of the fine structure of neurons, axons, synapses, neuralgia and choroid plexus, the interconnections among neurons, the location of specific tracers and antibodies which define synaptic terminals, and a survey of methodologies used with transmission electron microscopy. Pr.: Biol. 541 or AP 710.

AP 870. Advanced Cardiovascular Physiology. (2) I. in odd years. Comprehensive overview of cardiovascular physiology in domestic animals with special emphasis on the dog and horse, including current research. Pr.: AP 747 or equiv.

AP 880. Mechanisms of Drug Action. (3) I, in even years. Discussion of pharmacological mechanisms at the molecular and cellular level, including receptors, second messengers, and pharmacokinetics. Specialized areas of pharmacology such as neuropharmacology and drug design will be discussed. Areas of current research interest will be emphasized. Pr.: BIOCH 521.

AP 890. Problems in Pharmacology and Toxicology. (Var.) I, II, S. Individual investigation into the interactions of chemical compounds and living systems. Pr.: AP 770 or CS 895 or equiv.

AP 895. Equine Exercise Physiology. (2) I, in even years. Comprehensive overview of the physiology of exercise in the horse with comparison to other species. Emphasis will be on cardiovascular, respiratory, and musculoskeletal systems, including current research. Pr.: AP 747 or equiv.

AP 898. Master's Report. (2) I, II, S. Pr.: Consent of staff.

AP 899. Research. (1-4) I, II, S. For graduate students in the field of anatomy or physiology working toward the M.S. degree. Pr.: Consent of staff.

AP 901. Molecular Neurobiology. (2) II, in odd years. Topics of neurobiology are covered from a molecular perspective, including neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, the synapse, G-coupled receptors, pumps, ligand-gated and voltage-gated channels, sensory transduction, the action potential and other relevant phenomena. Pr.: BIOCH 521.

AP 925. Advanced Physiology. (3-5) I, II, S. The principles and techniques in the investigation of bioelectrical phenomena in relation to: (a) the physiology of the digestive organs, (b) myophysiology, (c) endocrinology, and (d) neurophysiology. Advanced physiological experiments will be conducted to provide an understanding of the applications of electronic equipment. Rec. and two three-hour labs a week. Pr.: AP 747 and consent of staff.

AP 995. Problems in Physiology. (Var.) I, II, S. Special problem-involving techniques utilized in studying the function of various organ systems of the body. Pr.: Consent of instructor.

AP 999. Research in Physiology. (1-6) I, II, S. For graduate students working toward the PhD degree. Pr.: Consent of staff.